2010 Charities

FIT For Charity is dedicated to supporting non-profit community organisations serving important, but not necessarily well-recognised needs, with limited fundraising capabilities. Supported charities that represent this principle are chosen from organisations in the greater Tokyo area. Funds are divided equally among them. In 2009, six community organisations received proceeds from the FIT For Charity 2009 event. As a non-standing organisation, FIT prefers to support community organisations on a one-year basis. By doing so, FIT can vary the organisations and therefore support a wide range of causes.

Because all members of the FIT For Charity Organising Committee are themselves unpaid volunteers, and because almost all of the elements needed to stage the FIT event are donated by companies and their employees, the community organisations supported by FIT receive 100% of all donations and participation fees, and over 90% of the total funds collected (92.7% in 2009).

Following a thorough review of organisations by the FIT for Charity 2010 Organising Committee, the following ten non-profit community organisations were selected to share equally in the proceeds of the 2010 run. We believe that these groups represent a good cross-section of the vital charitable work that takes place in Japan, and we at FIT ask for your support in helping them as well.

Bridge for Smile

Supports children who are in the process of, or have gotten out of childrens’ homes. Many struggle to get a job or higher education due to financial and social difficulties. Bridge for Smile provides programmes to help them get ready to live on their own and offers job training courses and seminars.

Hands On Tokyo

Promotes the growth of volunteerism by mobilising a diverse and multinational group of individuals and corporate volunteers and matching them with meaningful service opportunities which address environmental, education and social issues in the community.

Hospital Art Lab

Use art to bring warmness and joy to the lives of people in hospitals, who face terminal illnesses. Hospital Art Lab provides various projects every year at over 40 hospitals all over Japan to improve the quality of life in hospital and to bring a healing effect to patients.

International Educational Association for Children

Supports children living in orphanages in the Tokyo area to be responsible, confident and empowered. Programmes use the “LAST” principle (Learning, Art, Sports and Technology) to generate confidence and motivation in children who, given the circumstances, may struggle to feel empowered.

Japan Association for Refugees

Provides comprehensive – legal, social and community – assistance to refugees and asylum seekers in Japan. It also advocates to the Japanese government for a better refugee policy and raises awareness on the current refugee situation in Japan.

Lifelink

Aims to revitalise the Japanese society that sees more than 30,000 suicides each year. Lifelink treats suicide prevention as a “support for life” and tries to establish a comfortable society where people feel less anxiety and less likely to bring themselves to commit suicide.

Meisei Gakuen School for the Deaf

Sign language was banned in Japanese Deaf education for almost a century. Meisei Gakuen, established in 2008, uses sign language as the language of instruction for all school subjects.

Multicultural Center Tokyo

“Multicultural Free School” is a place where immigrant children, who cannot enter school due to the age limit of compulsory education in Japan, can study Japanese and other subjects everyday to aim for higher education.

Mutsumi Heim

Is a shelter for single mothers with children (under 18), of which many are the victims of domestic violence. It provides safe home, child care and guidance to re-establish their independence, counseling services and other therapeutic services to mothers and children.

PALETTE

Aims to achieve a society in which all people can participate regardless of their disabilities. PALETTE works on solving problems that people with disabilities face in their lives – chiefly housing, vocational training, employment, and cultural and leisure activities.